Thursday, June 4, 2015

All About Eve

Bette Davis (1908 - 1989) has been one of my favorite actresses since as long as I can remember. She was a classic, and there wasn't a role that she couldn't play, from the innocent victim to the heroine to the maniacal. Her leading lady role as Margot Channing in All About Eve was one of her finest, as well as she never looked more stunning.

All About Eve was filmed in the 1950's and won six Academy Awards. The leading lady character, Margo Channing, on stage and personally, feels defeated by the wiles of a younger woman, Eve Harrington. 
If you haven't watched All About Eve, it is a must for all women who have worked outside the home, whether you are a Broadway star or an administrative assistant - - you will relate. Through the working years outside the home, I have certainly met the notorious Eve. Oh hell, what am I talking about? Even when I have freelanced from home, I have had to deal with the notorious Eves'. 

The movie is very sophisticated, smart, and even bits of dry humor are spattered about. It is truly a lesson on human behavior. This is also a good movie for our male counterparts to watch as they will learn some great insights. If you have seen the movie - - see it again. All about Eve is timeless classic. 
"Funny business, a woman's career - the things you drop on your way up the ladder so you can move faster. You forget you'll need them again when you get back to being a woman. That's one career all females have in common, whether we like it or not: being a woman. Sooner or later, we've got to work at it, no matter how many other careers we've had or wanted. And in the last analysis, nothing's any good unless you can look up just before dinner or turn around in bed, and there he is. Without that, you're not a woman. You're something with a French provincial office or a book full of clippings, but you're not a woman. Slow curtain, the end." - Margot Channing, All About Eve

2 comments:

  1. "...nothing's any good unless you can look up just before dinner or turn around in bed, and there he is. Without that, you're not a woman."
    Do YOU believe this? Is this the message you want the women in your life to internalize? Really?

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  2. Hello Alexandra, Thanks for checking in. First of all, I think it is important to acknowledge that the script was written in the late 1940's and early 1950's, a very different time for women. The character Margot, was ahead of her time as she put her career ahead of her relationships, and in this scene she is reflecting. Do I really believe that? Yes and no is my answer, and an answer you may not want to hear. I have been living alone for 18 years now, as I wanted to put my personal projects and goals ahead of my relationships. In my daily life, and especially when I am in the thick of a project and met my accomplishments, I know I made the right decision. However, every so often I look back and reflect in my relationships (a marriage and later a significant other) and wondered since I am a woman, perhaps I should have been able to do it all, and have it all. Obviously, a woman does not "need" a man, but I think if we remove the "man" from the sentence and just put in "relationships" (friends and family), these special relationships add and enhance being a woman.

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